OLD MARSTON CHARITIES TRUST


For more information on the charity please contact the Charities Secretary at: clerk@oldmarston-pc.gov.uk, Tel. 01865 203139


Registered Charity No. 202785


Relief of the poor has been ongoing for centuries and was largely administered by the Vestry, the Church “office” although there were others in the form of Tithes. Originally 10% of crops was claimed and stored in the Tithe Barn of which many still exist in more rural areas. These were under the control of the Monasteries who used the food for their own use and for the poor. These were largely lost in the dissolution of the Monasteries by Henry VIII. The landlords created some tithes for specific purposes. There was one on a previous clerks property for the upkeep of the Chancel but it was annulled on the clerks purchase of the land. Recently a landowner was faced with a massive bill for the purpose, he being unaware of the Tithe.

Due to large numbers of vagrants Government action in the Poor Relief Act of 1603 followed. That placed the responsibility on the vestries in each parish. They were charged to collect from the inhabitants a rate assessed according to the value of their property sufficient to relieve the poor – the start of the Local Government, as we now know it. There were provisions for parishes to amalgamate for the purpose.

This worked, perhaps with varying success while the parishes were isolated and knew whom to assist because they were largely born in the parish. The movement of population following the Industrial Revolution confused the issue that was formalised by Boards of Guardians being appointed to serve groups of parishes with powers to collect the Poor Rate; it meant that the poor had to qualify by residence. The result was court cases galore to determine who was entitled to relief in that area. Unqualified persons were accompanied to the Parish boundary and told not to come back. That led to the creation of the workhouses where those without means were institutionalised often in harsh conditions men, women and children separated and given work to do. Eventually the workhouses were abolished and money given to the poor instead. That is the background under which some property occasionally remained with the Church for the relief of the poor; bequests were made to the Church for that purpose.

In Old Marston a rent charge of ten shillings per year was attached to the land at what is now 38 Oxford Road, by Mary Brett, in May 1671. It is still paid today. In the voluntary enclosure award in 1650 Marston Common, of 20 acres, was fenced and given to the parish for twelve persons, of whom the Parish Clerk was to be one, who were elected to allow each to graze one cow diminished, the field let and one twelfth of the rent received paid to the surviving commoners until they died, the remainder added to the Trust’s income. An area of land previously used for woodcutting was enclosed in exchange for an annual payment. A Trust was appointed to use the income for the poor.

Ann Simms Rippington left a charity for Church expenses and one for the purchase of coal for the poor in 1932. Rosa Simms in 1936 left money for Church expenses, the poor and the Church bells. These were overseen by the Charity Commission that made a new scheme of administering the Charity that put all the income into one pot in 1974 with Trustees, the Vicar, two appointed each by the Parish Council and Oxford City Council (in recognition of the fact that a large part of the Parish, that extended to St Clements was transferred to the City in 1926) and two co-opted. In living memory coal was brought and delivered to those in need but now vouchers distribute the income. Some local traders accept the vouchers as cash, subject to reimbursement by the Trust.

There are powers to use Trust money for a whole list of purposes related to the well-being of parishioners but the Charity is small for the options to be used.


Links to Other History Pages

History and Timeline of Marston; Geography of Old Marston; Archive News and Links; Maps; Street Names - the origin and meaning behind the names of Marston’s streets; St Nicholas Parish Church; Marston School History; History of Parish Council, Old Marston Charities Trust History; Old Marston Library Archives; Highways, Transport, Traffic and Parking; Medieval Marston; 1500s in Old Marston; 1600s in Old Marston; 1700s in Old Marston; 1800s in Old Marston; 1900s in Old Marston; Bell Ringers; Mill Lane Allotments; Mortimer Hall History; Planning and Development Archives; Other History Links.

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